This isn’t strictly a technology note, but it’s nerdy and pedantic, therefore in-scope. Please bear with me.

Kim and I got married in October 2011. The vast majority of the wedding planning was hers, but I had some ideas about the service, some of them very specific.

One of the things I kept a close eye on was the liturgy. I made sure that we noted (Trespasses, Doxology) for the Lord’s Prayer. That would be the version found in the 1928 Episcopal Book of Common Prayer. In restrospect, maybe we should have actually printed it. You might expect that most people know it whether observant Christian or not (I’m not Jewish but I am familiar with Baruch atah, Adonai Eloheinu). It turns out that there are plenty of minor variant English translations, with and without Doxology, in modern and ancient dialect.

The other thing I made sure to do was include sheet music. The wisdom of not assuming that everyone knew all the music that was to be played was driven home for me at a pair of funerals we attended over the past week. At both of them, only the lyrics were printed in the program. At both of them, most of the music was hymns with which I was familiar. And at both services, there was one hymn which I’d never heard before. In the case of the first service I know I wasn’t alone. I could have managed a creditable job of sight-reading after an intro verse, but no music to go with the lyrics made life hard.

So please make sure to be specific on the prayer and include the sheet music. People who gather from far and wide for your religious observance and may be less than familiar with local customs will be grateful.